Coronavirus (COVID-19) Response

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The Age of Quarantine: Emotional Well-Being for Parents and Caregivers


Charlotte getting her reading done creatively.

Resources compiled by Beth Truzansky/Building Bright Futures and Lauren Smith/Help Me Grow/Vermont Department of Health

Were there really only 31 days in March? Feels like 300! If you are feeling emotionally stretched, you’re not alone!

As a parent and virtual worker, the last two weeks have been intense for many of us. It’s hard to do it all…in fact I’m not sure it’s possible to do it all well and take care of ourselves. Yet, as a caregiver, attending to your own emotional well-being often slips to the bottom of the list.

Taking care of yourself isn’t a luxury. With children home and stress is running high, it’s more important than ever. Building Bright Futures has been collecting a host of resources to support Vermonters related to Coronavirus. Our mental health colleagues are sharing great ideas to support your emotional well-being such as this resource from colleague Dave Melnick at Northeastern Family Institute. Below are other tips are good reminders for emotional well-being. These tips were first shared in ‘Self-care in the Time of Coronavirus’ by Rae Jacobson first published by the Child Mind Institute.

Make time for yourself
Right now, much of the personal time that was part of daily routines — commutes, time alone at home or at the store, social time with friends — is not available for folks with kids at home. Without it, we have to be intentional about creating space to recharge and decompress. This could look like taking a shower or bath, walking around the block alone (or with your dog), or designating time to read or simply zone out after the kids have gone to bed.

Prioritize healthy choices
The added stress and lack of structure we’re all experiencing right now can make it easy to slip into habits that feel good in the moment but can be detrimental in the long term. “Make sure you’re eating properly, try to get enough sleep (but not too much!), and create a routine that includes physical activity,” recommends Jill Emanuele, PhD, a clinical psychologist at the Child Mind Institute. This doesn’t mean pressuring yourself to get into tip-top shape, or not eating ice cream or binging your favorite shows. It does mean being thoughtful and intentional about how you’re treating yourself and your body.

Be realistic
“Perfectionism and the coronavirus don’t mix,” says David Anderson, PhD, a clinical psychologist at the Child Mind Institute. “It’s time to be exceedingly realistic, both at work and as a parent.” Avoid burnout by setting realistic expectations and giving yourself grace if you can’t meet them. “Practice forgiveness and self-compassion,” says Dr. Anderson. Parents should remind themselves that these are unprecedented times. “There’s no playbook for this. Remember you’re doing your best during a very difficult time. Cut yourself some slack.”

Set boundaries
Anxiety is rampant right now. With so much worry and uncertainty floating around it can be easy to absorb other people’s fears and concerns without even realizing it. If you have a friend or family member who’s in the habit of sending worst-case-scenario news or is prone to sending anxiety-provoking text messages, practice a little emotional distancing. Let them know you sympathize but that you’re taking a break from worrying news, or simply hit the Do Not Disturb button. You can always reconnect when things are calmer.

Reconnect with things you enjoy
Think proactively of things you can do with this enforced time at home. Get back in touch with hobbies or activities you enjoy but rarely have time for, or make the choice to learn a new skill. Maybe there’s a knitting project you’ve always wanted to try, but you’ve been too busy. Or you’ve been meaning to learn how to needlepoint. Maybe you love jigsaw puzzles but with rushing between work and home and caring for kids, it’s been years since you had the time to do one. If young children make solo activities unrealistic, seek out activities you can enjoy together, like baking bread, or making art.

Finally, remember, being kind to yourself will not only help you stay calm during this difficult time, it will help ensure that you have the bandwidth you need to take good care of your family. When you’re running on fumes, caring for others can tax your already depleted resources to breaking point. But when you prioritize your needs, you’re filling the tank, emotionally and physically, and that means you’ll be in a position to offer comfort and care to others when they need it most.

Content from Child Mind Institute
Link: https://childmind.org/article/self-care-in-the-time-of-coronavirus/

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